Skene Mountain

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#Janowrimo Report

It’s time to officially report on my first ever JaNoWriMo challenge! My goal was to write 1000 words (approx 2-3 pgs in Word) every day for month of January. So, how’d I do?

Break it down: On December 31, I had 19k words for my WIP (Forte‘s sequel). It was good to have this head start. The story was already progressing and it didn’t feel like I had to create something from nothing. My average daily log turned out to be 1200 words — a good length for a solid scene or even a chapter. Lowest day = 600s. Highest was over 1800. I wrote *every day* except one toward the end, and even on that day I was plotting out my next scene in my mind. I logged my progress on Twitter, which helped me stay honest and focused. And being able to post my daily success felt like a small reward.

Although I’d recruited some writer friends to join me in JaNoWriMo, I didn’t hear from many throughout the month. With one exception: fellow Xchyler Publishing author R.A. Smith of the Grenshall Manor Chronicles. Russell and I connected via Twitter almost daily, and I believe we inspired each other to keep writing every January day. Thank you, Russell!

So, now it’s February. And my WIP is at . . . drum roll please . . . 53922! Already a legit length for a YA novel, I have at least two or three more chapters to pen before it’s done. It’s so close, I’ve been trying to keep up my daily writing routine until the draft is complete.

There’s one problem with that routine: I’m kind of boring when I’m writing.

Seriously. The days are cold and I’m hibernating with my computer. Even if the writing part only takes an hour or two, the rest of my day is consumed by thinking about it. Momentum is so important, which requires consistency and focus. It’s like an obsession. On a rare lunch out with my bestie, when she wanted to catch up, I had little to offer.

“I’m, like, hyper-focused on my writing. That’s all. I’m doing the mom thing and I’m writing.”

“So, tell me about your writing!”

“No! I’m too superstitious. I have to get the draft done first.”

You can imagine how riveting the rest of our lunch conversation was. My poor husband. I’m sure he’s eager to have me back.

But here’s the thing — the story I’m working on? It’s exciting! But I’m the only one who’s experiencing it. I can’t wait to get the draft out to my beta readers so I can finally talk about it!

Want to know what it’s about? Here’s a draft blurb of Forte’s sequel:

It’s been two years since Sami neutralized toxic Aquamarine on Skene Mountain, the scar on the hill now a stark reminder of what she’d destroyed. Hoping to make amends, she vows to use her magic to rebuild earthly devastation — to heal the world with her music. Problem is, her magic is lost. Her boyfriend Jason is lost too, as he’s left for college. When Sami attends a summer music program in hopes of finding her magic, she finds her childhood crush Miles is also in the program. Caught in a love triangle, Sami begins to have visions of tragic natural disasters close to home. When these visions turn into reality, it seems the superstorms are not random but caused by someone with specific powers — and an evil agenda. It’s up to Sami to figure out how to use her new magic to halt the next superstorm before everyone she loves is destroyed.

writing journal

My brainstorming journal. (Gift from Mom) My loyal writing companion. Its pages would make no sense to anyone but me.

Small town, BIG hero

TWILIGHT put Forks on the map. The small town in Washington state had never seen so much attention before being inundated with fictitious vampires and werewolves. Now, a small town in upstate New York is getting its due.

FORTE was featured in in the Arts section of our local paper recently. The focus of the article A Writer’s ‘Forte’ was its small town, local setting of Whitehall, New York (renamed its original Skenesboro in the book).

Why did I choose to set my book in Whitehall?

Whitehall is home of Skene Manor—a beautiful Victorian mansion that sits on the crest of Skene Mountain overlooking the village. As the article says, I admired Skene Manor every time I passed through Whitehall en route from North of Boston to Lake George. In my book, Skene Manor is a character in its own right — and I pull from local folklore to make it shrouded in mystery, with a rumor to be haunted.

Skene Manor, Whitehall, NY

Skene Manor overlooking Whitehall village and Lake Champlain canal

Skene Manor at night

FORTE original cover (& former title) showing Skene Manor at night

As described in FORTE:

As if the mansion magically rose up from the dark trees which surround it. Its turrets give it a medieval feel—like it’s from another world, another time. Its center turret daunting, like Catholic guilt. The floor-to-ceiling windows seem like eyes looking down on the insignificant town. Pointy dormers peek from under the angled roof as if kinking its eyebrows with suspicion. Only the wraparound porch saves it from a sinister feel. Tonight there’s a single light in an upstairs window. It winked out just after a shadow passed over it. Does no one live there? Why only the one light?

Of course, Skene Manor holds just as much intrigue on the inside as it does on the outside. Built by Judge Joseph H. Potter in the late 1800s, much of its gray sandstone was quarried from Skene Mountain. Once privately owned, it then became a bed & breakfast / restaurant, and is now managed by a historic preservation society — and is open to the public for lunches and tours.

Skene Manor foyer and falconry

Skene Manor foyer and falconry

As described in FORTE:

Beyond the grand archway, the main hall is framed with dark wood wainscoting. A wide wallpaper border encircles the room that repeats a scene of horsemen holding a hawk and a pack of dogs.

“Falconry,” Mrs. Potter says. “An old hunting technique. They’d release the falcon and the dogs follow to catch whatever prey the falcon finds. Quite sneaky, don’t you think?”

(Yes, I borrowed the name “Potter” from Skene Manor history, not from a young wizard named Harry.)

Lake Champlain canal (via Lock 12) runs through the center of the village of Whitehall, and also plays a big role in the book. Under this bridge, I placed “canal graffiti” that communicates an ancient feud in the town as well as a prophecy for Sami.

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As described in FORTE:

The canal water is active today, and echoes against the steel of Saunders Bridge. Without this water, the town of Skenesboro wouldn’t be here, Mr. Lachapelle had eagerly told us the first day of history class. These waterways transported supplies during the Revolutionary War, he’d said, but its claim to fame is “birthplace of the US Navy.” Apparently, everything started to crumble when highways and railroads were constructed. And the place kind of became a ghost town. No one uses the canal for trade anymore, really. Just boats coming through the lock for fishing, and then going right back north to Lake Champlain. I’d probably have no luck finding a boat to take me all the way to New York after all.

and

The hush beneath the bridge is calming without my music playing. The cars passing overhead sound like ocean waves. The canal water clucks softly. A dreamy willow tree hangs to the water on the opposite side. There’s an old waterfront building with faded white paint against the brick: Liberty Eatery & Marina.

Founded as “Skenesborough” by British Army Captain Philip Skene at the southern tip of Lake Champlain in 1759, it was renamed Whitehall after the Revolutionary War. Bordering Vermont, Whitehall showed us small-town hospitality when the Town Hall clerk met me and my husband off hours as we traveled in from Massachusetts to give us our marriage license for our New York wedding.

Whitehall, New York holds a special place in my heart.

Whitehall Harbor

Whitehall aka Skenesboro